Nutritional Facts

Pelagic fish are a rich source of omega-3.

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Oily fish, such as herring and mackerel are recommended as part of the diet because they contain long chain fatty acids. All the pelagic species are a high source of proteinMackerelherring and horse mackerel have high levels of monounsaturated fats while herring and blue whiting are low in saturated fat. Blue whiting is considered low fat as outlined in the tables below.

 


(Information based on raw mackerel)

 (Information based on raw herring)

 

 

 

 (Information based on raw horse mackerel)

 (Information based on raw blue whiting)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 High source of protein

Products can claim to be a high protein souce when at least 20% of the energy value is provided by protein as outlined in the Food Safety Authority of Ireland publication 'Information on Nurtrition and Health Claims'.

Monounsaturated fat

These fats are liquid at room temperature. These fats do not raise blood cholesterol. More information on fats can be found in the Food Safety Authority of Ireland publication 'Healthy Eating Guidelines 2011'.

Saturated fat

These fats are solid at room and are found in foods of animal origin such as butter, cream, fat in meat and dairy products as well as biscuits, cakes, chocolate, confectionery and savoury snacks. More information on fats can be found in the Food Safety Authority of Ireland publication 'Healthy Eating Guidelines 2011'.

Low fat

Products can claim to be low fat when they contain no more than 3g of fat per 100g as outlined in the Food Safety Authority of Ireland publication 'Information on Nurtrition and Health Claims'

 Long chain omega-3 fatty acids

Long chain omega-3 fatty acids are called DHA and EPA. They are only found in oily fish such as herring, mackerel, salmon, sardines, pilchards, kippers and trout. The human body has very limited ability to make long chain omega-3 fatty acids. Therefore, they are sometimes referred to as essential fatty acids.

Previous research by Holland et al., 1993 shown in the table below shows levels of EPA and DHA for a number of species. 

These long chain omega-3 fatty acids are very important as they help to prevent blood clots forming and are protective against heart disease. They are also important for brain and eye development in babies during pregnancy and early life. This is why fish is recommended, especially oily fish. More information can be found in the Food Safety Authority of Ireland publication 'Healthy Eating Guidelines 2011'.

 

Holland, B., Brown, J., & Bus, D.H., 1993. Fish and Fish Products; the third supplement to McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Fodds (5th Edition), HMSO, London. Food Standards Agency (2002) McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods sixth summary edition. Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry. MAFF (1998) Fatty Acids; Seventh supplement to McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods (5th Edition), HMSO, London.